From Panthers to Ticos

1. We learned a lot about different farming techniques and aspects from traveling to various plantations. Summing up the different approaches, we saw coop farming (Dota), family owned (banana) and large scale farming (pineapple farm, Doka). Co-op farming was unique in the sense that it was made up of 900 small farms and was, more…

A Whole Latte Coffee

Today, we learned about how a cooperative coffee industry (Dota) operates and produces. Their process is very different than any other plantation we visited. A cooperative is much like a big cooperation of the whole community. There are surely advantages and disadvantages to a process like so. The cooperative serves as an advantage to the…

Pineapple Fields Forever

The supply chain for the fruits vs coffee is very different. I don’t think you necessarily quantify the levels of difficulty but there seems to be more steps on the coffee industry. Coffee required growing, harvesting, cleaning, drying, roasting, etc. Like we saw between Doka and Café Britt, this required multiple companies to produce. However,…

Arriving in Arenal

There was a significant contrast between Arenal and Monteverde. Arenal had more apparent animals and wildlife like monkeys and a baby leopard. Arenal felt more like a jungle rainforest and monteverde just felt like a forest. Tourists like coming to Arenal to see the volcano and it’s more geared towards tourists. There’s many hotels and…

Searching for Sustainability

I observed that the lifestyle of a Tico farmer is very natural. They’re more connected with nature and their consumption/effects of their lifestyle. They can see the effects of their life first hand. The farm raises animals and grows an exceptionally large garden. From the livestock and plants, they get all their food (except rice)…

Climbing through the Clouds

During the lecture today, we learned about the different interests and opinions of more native ticos versus the quakers. Don Guillermo’s talk today seemed more realistic and addressed the real issues of climate change that come from tourism, raising livestock, etc. The conflicting interests productivity, conservation, and sustainability are complex issues. What I understood from…

Views in Monteverde

Today, we traveled from Heredia to the beautiful region of Monteverde. As we started out our drive, the communities and neighborhoods were very condensed and in close quarters. When we got farther away and more into rural areas, houses were spread out and I noticed many people using them as store fronts. On the drive,…

Brewin’ at Britt

At our visit to Café Britt today, we learned about their marketing techniques and manufacturing process. In contrast to Doka, they’re more focused on the consumer experience and roasting process. Because there product is high quality and consumer experience based, many of their customers are tourists. Their bags of coffee grounds even have pictures of…

A Mocha from Doka

Today, we visited the Doka Coffee Plantation. It was interesting to see how intricate and time consuming the production of coffee is. The start of one cup of coffee in America begins from one small seed, thousands of miles away. It’s easy to forget how much effort and planning goes into a single cup. One…

Día Uno

Costa Rica is a lot like I expected it to be. When we first arrived, I was actually surprised at how populated it is and to see a lot of American chains. I thought it would be more rural and not so built up. Many people seemed more surprised to see us then we were…

If you like coffee and bananas…And gettin’ caught in the rain 

Costa Rica’s apparent focus on their sustainability definitely makes them seem more progressive and cooler. They seem hip because they care more about the environment given their passion for sustainable practices. According to my research, they are actually ranked the second most sustainable country in the world. They get their title from using mainly renewable…